INVENTING THE UNIVERSITY DAVID BARTHOLOMAE PDF

Nov 14, [intro] Welcome to MR the podcast for beginngs and insiders aboutt he ideas, people and movements who have shaped rhetorical history. For many of them, this was the first time they had been asked to write a rhetorical analysis and this assignment always makes me nervous. I give them sample papers. We practice writing a rhetorical analysis together. We discuss in depth examples and abuses of ethos, logos, and pathos, but many of them struggle tremendously.

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Looking Back I wanted to learn about what Bartholomae wanted his readers to understand and take from the peice; who are his targeted readers anyway; how does he plan to affect their opinion and get out his message. Bartholomae definitely says that it is. However, should everybody adhere to this advice? What makes Bartholomae credible in his writing? For whom does this information even concern?

By simply looking to the areas of a rhetorical analysis, the answers to all of the questions can be answered.

I clearly see this as his audience and purpose with in the examples he provides in the text. There for his audience must be either those just learning to write using such important techniques students or those creating lesson plans for the learners and deciphering which techniques are most important to know teachers.

He notes that the writer must speak as a specialized individual, using vocabulary appropriated by the field of study of the topic.

Again the question arises, why is this so important? By neglecting to use this method of inventing the university, one loses their credibility. After all, would it make sense to have a carpenter speak to a science professor about genetics using the carpentry language?

This is what Bartholomae is trying to explain. We are not to talk down on our audience as Bartholomae implies, nor should we look at them as being mightier than us. Rather we should speak as equals in the field, whether this is actually the case or not, to prove a credibility and understanding of the subject to our audience. As towards the appeals of Bartholomaes essay, he maintains a great Ethos ethical appeal and logos logical appeal though out the whole piece.

He effectively establishes his own credibility in multiple ways, thus adding to his ethos. Considering his audience contains literary teachers, he speaks in a language that they could understand and relate too. He also gains credibility from his other audience members, the students, in a different manor. To relate most effectively to them, he uses a few resources such as his student essay examples and reviews them again in a language-appropriate manor.

Also to add to his credibility, he brings in other authors with acceptable and appropriate statuses with in the field including Aristotle and Linda S. Flower to back him up. By doing this, Bartholomae effectively points out that he is not alone in his theories of thinking.

As for the logos of the piece, Bartholomae uses these authors and other resources to provide facts and detailed examples that support his claim. This creates an effective logical aspect clearly provided with in the piece. Throughout the piece, I find that the writer tends to use a calm, helpful tone.

However its absence of strength still limits the emotional appeal to the readers. In this case however, I believe the deficiency of pathos help Bartholomae connect with is audience. Had Bartholomae come on strong and with harsh emotion either towards or against the mater, his audience of students and teachers may have appointed this as being less credible for not being open to the opposition. On the other hand, had he spoke meekly, the assertion of the importance of this piece may have been loss.

With all of this said, I believe that the pathos appeal shown in the text indubitably serves the purpose for this piece, despite its weak presence. Next Bartholomae chooses to display an example of the usage of this technique with a student college entry essay. This I find to be especially important for the readers understanding as well. Having this example presented to them helps to define its purpose and importance, ultimately helping Bartholomae make his claim. To further this point then, he again adds another example of students writing.

This one however, neglects the usage of inventing the university. The sequence of examples the author chose in this case is relatively important, may I add. By placing the example containing the technique first, readers are then better able to understand what the term means and how it is to be used. Then they may go on to see how it is missing the next piece.

Had it been switched around, readers may have faced some confusion. Lastly, Bartholomae wraps up his piece by bringing in two helpful authors to argue with him. He presents a clear audience teachers and students and plays out his ethos logos and pathos in a way to gain there attention and persuade them of his purpose.

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David Bartholomae

Looking Back I wanted to learn about what Bartholomae wanted his readers to understand and take from the peice; who are his targeted readers anyway; how does he plan to affect their opinion and get out his message. Bartholomae definitely says that it is. However, should everybody adhere to this advice? What makes Bartholomae credible in his writing? For whom does this information even concern?

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Inventing the University

Wednesday, September 5, "Inventing the University" Summary David Bartholomae writes about different conflicts students face while writing. One of the most important points he wants to get across to the reader is how students have to invent the university. In the same process of learning how to write he also has to learn how to speak the language that expert writers use. This new language and vocabulary is not going to be the same you use when you speak to your family or friends. Common places are a reference point which helps and guide us to know the type of language or vocabulary we need to use in every specific situation. These situations could go from writing an essay in english class to writing an email to your best friend. The language from these two situations will be completely different.

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Bartholomae’s “Inventing the University”

They cannot sit through lectures and read textbooks and, as a consequence, write as sociologists or write literary criticism. There must be steps along the way. Some of these steps will be marked by drafts and revisions. Some will be marked by courses, and in an ideal curriculum the preliminary courses would be writing courses, whether housed in an English department or not. His text is divided into three sections. He examines a student writing sample and discusses the moves the student has made, illustrating how the student at times appropriates and at times fails to appropriate convention. Much of the written work that students do is test-taking, report or summary — work that places them outside the official discourse of the academic community, where they are expected to admire and report on what we do, rather than inside that discourse, where they can do its work and participate in a common enterprise.

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